Repainting a Secondhand 09 Wagon

As part of my spending spree on secondhand 09 models I brought these two wagons. I like both of the wagons but I don’t really like the grey livery. I decided to experiment with repainting one of them.

I chose the flat wagon, gave it a coat of Humbrol 160 German Camoulfage Brown, and then dry brushed it with a wide range of browns and black. When I dry brush models, I dip the brush into the paint, wipe the brush on paper until it leaves virtually no trace of paint and then run the brush over the model.

I thought the headstocks looked rather plain.

I added some Grandt line rivets to each end. It’s easy to do. You drill a hole and push the ‘shank’ of the rivet into the hole.

When I used these rivets for the first time I tried to put the glue on the shank before pushing it into the hole, or I added the glue into the hole using a small pin. Neither of these approaches worked very well. The glue tends to spead out of the hole when you push the rivet in and the glue spreads onto the model. It is much easier to apply the glue on the inside of the model and let it be drawn down the shank from the inside. Obviously, this isn’t always possible but in this case it worked well.

Here’s the completed model with the rivets painted and a coat of varnish.

I prefer this to the original grey colour, but I’m not ‘wowed’ by the model. It still looks rather plain. Perhaps, adding an interesting load will help.

I am going to wait for some more inspiration before touching the open wagon.

 

 

 

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Vantastic

Here is the finished Unit Models O9 box van.

No rocket science was involved in finishing it, although a steady hand was useful when painting the iron work details.

I used Humbrol acrylics for the basic colours. The body is German Camoflage (160) with Dirty Black (RC401) for the iron work and Engineers Grey (RC413) for the roof.

The weathering was done by drybrushing with Citadel acrylics. Ulthuan Grey to create a worn look, XV88 mixed with a small amount of Doombull Brown for the rust effect, some Stirland Mud around the bottom of the door and a hint of Caliban Green in places on the roof. A few coats of varnish, some couplings and ‘job done’.

I’m rather pleased with it. Many thanks to David Gander for giving me the original kit.

A Bit More Boxing

I’ve been working on the Unit Models box van I’m building. I glued the chassis mount molding to the floor of the van. I added a sheet of lead to the floor inside the van to provide some additional weight. I can add more lead to the chassis but I’m not sure I’ll need it.

Next, I glued the roof on. The araldite sets quite slowly so I held it in place with rubber bands. The pieces of coffee stirrer were supposed to spread out the pressure over a larger area to help the roof stick down along the sides of the van. I’ve no idea if it made a difference but it seemed like a good idea at the time!

When the roof had set, I stuck on the Peco wagon chassis. I wondered if the van would look better with slightly larger axle boxes. I created some dummy axle boxes from plasticard and stuck them over the originals.

Next, I’ll give the van a good clean, and paint it with primer.

Box Van in a Box

At a recent Beds and Buck Narrow Gauge Meeting David Gander kindly gave me an unmade kit of a Unit Models O9 Box Van.

I was very pleased for several reasons. Mostly, because it’s a very kind gift (thanks David!). Also, Unit Models is passing to a new owner and these kits are hard to find at the moment. Finally, it’s a nice model, with crisp moldings and the style fits in well with the O9 wagons I’ve been scratch building.

It would be really easy to make the kit but I wondered if I could add a bit more detail to the body.

I have a pack of Grandt Line 32 thou diameter rivets I haven’t used. I thought these would look good on the iron work of the box van. 32 thou is roughly 1.4 inches in 7mm scale which seems about right.

The rivets come with a plastic shank that can be fitted into a 0.4mm diameter hole in the model. This helps anchor the rivet in place.

One rivet equals one hole, so I set about marking out and drilling 64 holes in the body. It was a good test of how accurately I can mark out and drill. I made a cardboard template to help position the holes.

The final effect looks good – but it took ages to do!

Three New O9 Wagons

… and the wagons are brown. Humbrol German Camouflage (160) to be precise.

I do like the colour. In fact, I got so excited by the warm, red-brown I forgot to photograph them before I weathered them!

All three wagons are the same colour. One appears to be lighter because it has received less weathering with Citadel ‘Stirland Mud’ and a bit more Citadel ‘Ulthuan Grey’.

If you are interested you can follow how I made them here (you’ll need to scroll down the page…).

Paint Your (Flat) Wagon

I have (finally) painted the flat wagons I built in January this year. Last time they were on the blog they were bear plasticard.

I like painting on lots of different layers. It’s really easy to do with acrylic paints and leads to some nice effects. Perhaps I’m over complicating things but here’s what I did:

  1. Primer Citadel Coraz White (light Grey)
  2. Paint chassis Humbrol Dirty Black mixed with a small amount Citadel Ulthuan Grey
  3. Rough coat of Citadel Zandri dust – semi dry brush of top, wet brush underneath
  4. Touch up black on chassis
  5. Wash of dilute Humbrol Dirty Black
  6. Dry brush chassis and wagon in Citadel Ulthuan Grey
  7. Dry brush chassis and  wagon Citadel Zandi Dust
  8. Dry brush chassis and  wagon Citadel Steel Legion Drag
  9. Dry brush chassis with rust mix (Citadel XV88 mixed with small amount of Citadel Dunbar Brown)
  10. Wash with dilute Humbrol Dirty Black – three times

I rather like the end result.

Single Plank O9 Wagons

The scratch building of O9 wagons continues. The latest wagons to be completed are this pair of single plank wagons.

The construction was essentially the same as the open wagon I made. The fake sole bars, floor, sides, hinges and rivet details were made from plastic card and rod. The main difference is these wagons are built on the Peco N Gauge 15ft Wagon Chassis (NR122) and are slightly longer than the open wagon.

The two wagons were made to resemble one another, with small differences. The one on the right is slightly longer (52mm compared to 48mm), has more hinges on the side planks and has shorter end stanchions.

I designed the wagons so they would accommodate the Skytrex Model Railways O scale packing cases and crates. This has worked out well and the loads look good in the wagons.

Both wagons are painted in manufacturer’s photographic grey (also known as primer 🙂 ) because I still haven’t decided what colour to paint my O9 stock !