Carry on Coaching

I have continued work on the open bogie coach. I have cut out the side and end panels from 1mm thick plasticard.

Next, I attached them to the coach, and added some seat supports. Then I cut out the seats themselves. Each one has a groove in it to represent planks of wood.

Finally, I added some buffer beams to the ends of the coach and some U channel to represent the sole bars. The underside of the coach isn’t particularly pretty, but it will be hidden from view.

As everything was assembled I decided to add a few coats of primer. I’m always amazed how much better a model looks after the primer.

Now for a nice livery. I fancy a lightish green…..

 

 

Simple O9 Coaches

In the 7mm Narrow Gauge Association handbook ‘Going Minimum Gauge’ Colin Peake wrote a really good ‘step-by-step’ article showing how to build freelance miniature railway coaches. The article describes how to make a four wheel, eight seater coach. At the end Colin included a photo of a 12 seater bogie coach that you can build using the same approach.

I particularly liked the bogie coach and I decided to try to build one. I’ve never made anything with bogies before. I contacted Colin and he gave me some good advice on which bogies to use and how to brace the underside of the carriage. Thanks Colin!

Armed with all this info I could start.

First, I made the floor of the coach from a 88 x 26 mm piece of 1.5mm thick plasticard. I scored the card at 4mm intervals to represent planking.

I decided to mount the bogies on 2mm diameter bolts. These fit nicely through the existing hole in the Parkside Dundas bogies. I made two pieces of plasticard, drilled a 4mm diameter hole in each one, and araldited the heads of the bolts into the holes (see left hand end of chassis).

The flanges of the wheels protrude slightly above the top of the bogies. I made two small spacers from 0.5mm plasticard (see right hand end of chassis). These increase the gap between the plastic mounts and the bogies and stop the flanges catching on the plastic.

The bogies are held in place with small nuts.

As this is my first bogie vehicle, I wanted to test it before I went any further. I tried it on my test track, weighted down with the first piece of lead that came to hand. I was pleased to see it negotiated the 9½ inch (approx. 24cm) radius curves on the test track without any problems (click the image to view the video).

Great 🙂  Now, on with the rest of the build.

 

 

 

 

For Sale !

After my last blog where I enthused about the beauty of the Waggonfabrik Uerdingen AG coaches on the Waveney Valley Railway I received an email from Mark Crane with some very interesting information.

Mark told me that Station Road Steam in Lincolnshire have restored one of the coaches and it is for sale. Full details of the coach and a lot more pictures can be found on the Station Road Steam website here.

I must say the Station Road Steam team have done a fantastic job of the restoration. Look at the beautiful teak and the lovely green livery. The coach is priced at £11,500. I’m no expert on the value on miniature railway stock but that seems pretty reasonable to me.

Gosh, I am tempted. Although there are a few minor things I have to keep in mind.

  1. I don’t have the space to store it.
  2. I don’t have any track to run it on.
  3. I’m not sure I can persuade my wife that we really need a vintage miniature railway coach.
  4. I searched hard but I can only find £2.53 down the back of the sofa

I guess it will have to stay a pipe dream until I win the lottery!

Many thanks to Mark for emailing me, and fuelling my dreams. (Mark – I tried to reply but my mails are bouncing back because your servers think my emails are spam. I suppose IT systems don’t appreciate trains like we do!).

Finally, I hope the Station Road Steam team don’t mind me using one of their photos for this blog. The coach is so beautiful I couldn’t resist….

The ‘Workhorse’ Coaches are Finished

Finished CoachesThe coaches and brake van are finished. I wanted them to look like the ‘workhorse’ coaches for the line so they are painted in a simple green livery with dark grey roofs (Humbrol GWR/BR Green and Humbrol BR Coach Roof Grey).

I do like to see people in coaches so there are passengers and guards inside. It does take time to paint the figures but it brings things to life.

There is a small amount of detailing on the stock. I painted brass door handles and added some Springside Models tail lamps to the brake vans. Add Greenwich couplings and they are ready to roll. I can’t wait to test them on the track….

Partly Painted

Partly PaintedI’ve partly painted the carriages. They’re not quite right but they are getting there.

They will need some passengers so I have some ‘matchstick people’ on my workbench too. I need a little more inspiration for the colours of their clothes. Hopefully a quick image search will inspire me…

Matchstick People

Pick and Mix

ParksideDundas VoR Coaches and Brake Van

On my workbench at the moment are four Parkside Dundas kits. Two are two compartment 4 wheel coaches (one as a brake), one is an open two compartment 4 wheel coach and the last is a 4 wheel guards van. The brake van is a Vale of Rheidol prototype and the others are freelance designs based on VoR / Glyn Valley Tramway style rolling stock.

My plan is to combine them to make a variety of two and three coach passenger trains.  I’m hoping these short trains will work well on my small layout.